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it is not. america is the oldest country in the modern world. because the american constitution provided us with a template for classless democracy. not the america that she did but certainly that was the ideological template around it. india is important, 1947, because india is the oldest nation and the postcolonial world. and the indian constitution similarly creates an ideological template for democracy. but with the emergence of india also emerged china, and china had a different template. again, not getting into what is right and what is wrong, but these are alternative -- how to run your nation and postcolonial society. and very interesting we received in comparison to parties, won the congress and the chinese communist party. actually became the dominant force in the post-independent state. one advocate would have to be -- because both emerge from ravaged economically driven set of needs. the congress offered soft left. the chinese offered hard left, or autocratic left. a long story, both had -- >> you said long story shorter i want to get to the short part. spent discussing it with
-health clinical line. used together, they help keep your teeth 97% as clean as a dental cleaning. the toothpaste actually reduces plaque. and the rinse reaches all areas and is clinically proven to help prevent plaque regrowth. crest pro-health clinical line. together, they help keep your teeth 97% as clean as a dental cleaning. crest. life opens up when you do. ♪ >>> a significant announcement from president obama during an exclusive interview with our very open barbara walters. >> the president said his administration now formally recognizes a newly formed coalition of syrian rebels. that is significant. the rebels for fighting to topple syria's president. here's her report. >> i would like to talk about syria. do you plan to recognize the opposition and give them some legitimacy? >> we made a decision that the syrian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough, is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population that we consider them the legitimate representative of the syrian people in opposition to the assad regime and so we will provide them recognition and obviously with t
seaport complex at a near standstill for the eighth straight day. drake christopher is going to join us with how this could impact your holiday season. lori: i was just kidding, actually. bacon is kosher. i do not eat kosher. melissa: speaking of kosher -- lori: rubbing elbows with the royals. our next ambassador -- you are speechless. melissa: i do not know about that one. time for stocks now as we do every 15 minutes. nicole petallides is standing by. nicole: right now, we are seeing the dow jones industrial average down just 12 points. so far, we are having a losing week on wall street. let's see what happens at the end of the day. these moves are really fractional. the s&p down a third of a percent. december, traditionally, is the best month for the s&p 500 since 1950. we will see whether or not that seems to come to correlation. i want to take a look at some of the auto retailers. it turns out they are not doing so well with their sales. pat boys, in particular, revenue missing for the third time in a row. both companies not seeing sales. warmer weather plays a role. back to you. m
us and we're going to get a deal that has some integrity. and i've said before, if we get anything that makes meaningful step towards fixing our fiscal problem, you're going to see the market go up a couple thousand points. i think that is a, you know, 20% chance in 2013. i think we could really go some place, if politicians show some leadership. >> that's only 20% that they have integrity. >> yeah, yeah. that's up from earlier today. >> thank you, john, thank you guys for being with us today. make sure you join us on monday. "squawk on the street" begins right now. ♪ >>> good friday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street" on this final friday trading session of the year. i'm carl quintanilla at the new york stock exchange, along with melissa lee. >> that's a good song. >> i actually requested that a few moments ago. cramer and faber had the day off. the market has a few jitters as we enter what is going to be an interesting day. of course, the meeting at the white house, 3:00 between the president and some congressional leaders. as for europe, getting some data out of japan o
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
gdp, the entire economic output of the u.s. they have come down a little bit. economists think to be sustainable, budget deficits have to be in the range of 3% of economic output or a lower. the focus of this effort to reduce deficits now is on getting them, in the federal budget deficit to the range of 3% or so. that is what i mean when i say policymakers are not trying to get rid of the budget deficits. given the economic weakness, a little bit of deficit spending is probably not a terrible thing, at least in the eyes of some budget economists. i think there would be comfort in washington around 3% of gdp. getting there is a big challenge. there are problems with medicare and social security. they are facing big deficit situations. host: what motivates the creation of deductions? what about the other incentives? mortgage deduction it to encourage people to buy a home. guest: some of the deductions have been around forever, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish betwe
:00 p.m., first responders benefited on long beach island. make sure you join us on monday. "squawk on the street" is next. >>> good friday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." live at the nyse. a blowout session in shanghai overnight. best single day gain in more than three years on a pretty decent pmi. europe has also been a blend of red and green as the ft names ecb chief the person of the year. we're going to kick off with breaking news. for that would, we go to david faber. >> news on best buy, in the news yesterday. the stock up sharply. what we can tell you right now is the board of directors of best buy, and its founder, richard schultz, has been trying to put together a group to essentially buy the company in a go private transaction, have extended the deadline in which he would need to come with a bid for best buy and created a window in fact that will begin on february 1st next year and end with the end of that month on february the 28th. giving schultz the opportunity to look at not just christmas sales, but the end of their fiscal year, which will end at best buy
into the cooler, got all of the employees in the cooler, and it came right over us. >> it blew the roofs off of homes, and on this christmas day, not even a house of worship was safe. the front wall was torn off. >> look at that tornado. >> across much of the south, many spent christmas in the dark as twisters came through. >>> tornado winds in mississippi damaged homes, and two men were killed from falling trees. >> it's a mess. >> as a funnel cloud came from mobile joe michael love shot this video from his home. >> what was that? >> that's transformers. >> i'm at my son's high school it's pretty destroyed. all of the portable classrooms are gone. >> reporter: and no serious injuries reported here but it is daylight and crews are now back out assessing the situation. >> thank you, the rough weather is affecting travel across the country. more than 500 flights were cancels onled on christmas day. tiffany wilson is in oxford ohio. the snow started falling around 5:00 this morning, you see the blows have just gone through, we have a couple inches of snow blizzard like condit
word for it. two-thirds of the american public agrees with us but you don't need to take their word for it, either. just listen to the voices within speaker boehner's own party. there we go. a kent conrad i am not in terms of my facility with charts. it's clear that speaker boehner has needed cover from his right flank before he could agree to any deal on taxes with the president. the speaker didn't have it before, but he sure has it now. when "the wall street journal" editorial page says that decoupling would not go against conservatives' antitax principles, that gives a whole lot of cover to the speaker. when grover norquist refuses to declare whether decoupling would violate his group's pledge, that, too, gives a whole lot of cover to the speaker. and when more and more rank-and-file republicans come out publicly every day in favor of passing the senate bill, that, too, gives cover to the speaker. you really have to absolute cram tom cole. he was the first one on the other side to dare speak the truth about what should be done on taxes and he's been on tv almost every day making
it is embarrassing to compared government funding for amtrak with u.s. government funding for domestic aviation and highway speed passenger >> to build and maintain one of the best highways systems in the world, we've spent $114 billion and built it over 45 years and today it would be $126 billion. con jex on our roads are at historic levels and by 2020 urban interstates will be at or over capacity. and anyone who has had the pleasure of flying recently they know the problems that plag our nation's airport ch airports, in fact, in spite of all this amtrak carries more riders from new york to boston than all other airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of hig
massachusetts. mr. markey: and if barney frank was down here, none of us would have -- none of this would have happened in terms of the understanding of the parliamentary procedure. he was up there trying to grab an managenary microphone. . john oliver has been for us -- olver, has been for us an invaluable colleague. he taught so much to us. when he sat down with us talking about transportation, he explained our own districts to us as far as what was possible. on climate change, i talked to him for about 20 years. he was on this issue in the early 1990's and probably understood it probably even before that. he is that smart. he is that visionary in terms of the issues are essential not just to massachusetts, but to our planet. and it has been migrate honor to have served with you, john and to have called you my friend and colleague overall of these years and we thank you so much for what you have done for us and for the country and thank you. and with that -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. under the speaker's announced policy of january 5, 2011, the gentleman from
is used to guide us, but a waste of money. the government should be involved in the. unfortunately, there are times when people evaluate investments that help our poorest children, the people in the toughest, most disadvantaged neighborhoods, some of our most intractable problems even with, for example, young people rescued from trafficking. these are very, very difficult problems. and we should evaluate and see what works. but we should also insist again there's not a double standard, so that if an evaluation, single evaluation or even a couple of evaluations somehow show that a particular strategy is not worth well, that is a motivation to do things better and smarter, not an excuse or reason to say government has no business being involved in that endeavor. so i think we need to be more change, accountability, evaluation, but not a tougher, higher double standard just when it comes to young people from the most disadvantaged and troubled environment. so there is so much to talk about in the innovation area. let me just mention a few things that we are focused on and then we can
against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. if we're talking months, we're talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors. that would be uncharted territory. host: joe from arizona on the republican line. caller: good morning. if we look at it logically, sarah is on the right track. we have become a society with honesty as a technicality. you can get more money but you break the law. our society -- you need to stop your people on the show, politicians and say, i asked you a question and you didn't answer it. this is why the doctors in medicar
military. and so when i see raises for the troops it pleases i think all of us. i'm concerned about the afghanistan timeline. i had hoped that it could be expedited. i certainly do commend the iron dome because we saw it work with respect to israel. i question however the drones that may have collateral damage. but i do think it's important that this bill does in fact make a commitment to protecting the women and children of afghanistan, responds to the issues dealing with sexual assault against military personnel and particularly women and it's strong on iran sanctions. . i rise today as well because when we talk about people we talk about men and women in the united states military, we talk about their health. yesterday in the rules committee i raised this point and i raise it again, i'm going to support this bill because i think it will make a leap of faith commitment to finding the cause of triple negative breast cancer. they are usually of a higher grade and size, onset at a younger age, more aggressive, and more likely to metastasize. the survival rate for breast cancer may ha
't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these re
. [laughter] two of us so far. i will see you at the reunion dinner. [applause] [laughter] i am sure the press will not read too much into that one. [laughter] i want to thank you all for your kind hospitality. i want to thank you, jimmy, for holding this event. wherever i went, people would say, i work for jack kemp. that legacy lives on some much because of the connection to the family. there was something this legacy .as such reach hi it is an honor to be a part of this an. jack kemp was my mentor. knowing jack kemp was one of the greatest experiences of my life. i was lucky to work with him. i do not know if bill is here. he has to wake up really early in the morning to do his radio show. he and i served in the house of representatives. we had our top hits. -- tough hits. we share something in common. we both used to be the next vice president of the united states. [applause] though i wish this election turned out a little differently, i am proud of a campaign has mitt romney and i ran. he would have been a great president. it would have been an honor to serve at his side. we gave this rac
of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 229. the nays are 182. 2/3 not being in the affirmative, the rules are not suspended and the bill is not passed. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leaves of absence for mr. griffin of arkansas for the week of december 11 and mr. reyes of texas for today and for the balance of the week. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the requests are granted. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the speaker pro tempore: members and staff, please remove your conversations from the floor. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts rise? >> address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, earlier this year -- mr. frank: i was c
.irs.gov. host: nina olson, welcome back to c-span and thank you for being with us. host: we want to welcome sarah kliff, a health care reporter with "the washington post." as we continue our series, we want to take a look at different aspects of what we can expect as we face the january 1 deadline. we want to talk about the said likely the doc fix. many people say you have to understand the doc fix. guest: it is something we have had since about a decade ago. back in 1997, congress set a formula for how to pay doc fares. it worked for about five years until the cost of health care started growing. what we have seen every year is congress passed a temporary pay patch to make up the difference. every year, we get to the end of the year and there is this impending gap. right now if we do not pass it, medicare salaries will go down by 25%. everyone thinks the doc fix is not a good idea and we should fix it permanently. it is something that we face every year. host: if nothing happens next year, the cost is estimated to be $25 billion. over two years, $41 billion. guest: it is expensive and we a
, a u.s. investigation finds more evidence about how walmart used payoffs allegedly in mexico to advance its gold down there. it's tuesday, december 18th, 2012. "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin. our guest host this hour is julia sed. fiscal cliff negotiations, our top story. now president obama is proposing leaving lower tax rates in place for everyone except those earning $400,000 and above. that's above the $250,000 threshold that the president has been demanding for months, but it is still far from speaker john boehner's request of $1 million. a source familiar with the talk says this is by no means the final offer for the white house. the move by the president was welcomed, albeit with some reservations. we will talk about the latest developments in just a few minutes. in the meantime, the global markets seem to be taking note of the optimism. you can see right now that those dow futures are up by 54 points. this comes after a decent rally for the markets yeste
he told uses threats have been narrowed down to a couple of cell phones. that is new information tonight. we are watching this one closely and we will keep you posted. it is time for the last word. have a great night. >> okay massachusetts, are you ready for another scott brown senate campaign? >> there are so many things we need to get done. >> today i made the decision. >> withdrawing her own name. >> not to continue to be considered. >> she had to remove her name. >> to be the next secretary of state. >> to be the best thing for our country. >> i don't believe she deserves to be promoted. >> i don't trust her. >> this is not going to help republicans at all. >> there are so many things we need to get done. >> most of you want compromise. >> the two sides are talking. >> let's get real. >> let really get real. >> tensions in washington are nearing critical mass. >> here we are at the 11th hour. >> 18 days. >> the republicans sent a letter. >> we made a reasonable offer. >> it is this issue spending. >> let's all take a deep breath. >> voters trust the president to handle negoti
twitter, a post a comment on facebook, or write us an e-mail. the theme of optimism or lack of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more
into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducing this legislation. the intill bipartisan in its approach, it creates a means for properly commemorating the cent
. host: sarah kliff covers health care for "the washington post." thank you for joining us. we take a look at america by the numbers and what america looks like by the year 2016. jennifer ortman and william frey here to talk about america by the numbers. we are back in a moment. >> president obama in the reaction to the connecticut shootings. later, the impacts of the so- called fiscal cliff on tax filings. >> president obama on the school shooting in connecticut. he said the time is not to take meaningful action. he was notified by homeland security advisor john brennan. he ordered flags lowered to half staff. this is about 5 minutes. >> i spoke with governor malloy and fbi director muller. i offered governor malloy my condolences on behalf of the nation and made it clear he will have every resource he needs to investigate this crime, care for theirctimw and families. we have endured too many of these tragedies. each time i learned the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. that was true today. there is not a parent in america who does not feel the
>> let us pray. gracious god, sovereign lord of history, thank you for the exemplary impact of senator daniel ken inouye on our national history. lord, we are grateful for the excellence that distinguished his significant career for the quiet grace and dignity with which he represented the aloha state. and for the gift of discernment that enabled him to serve you faithfully for the good of america. as we express gratitude for the laudable footprints he left in the sands of time, give us your power to persevere impromptly doing what is right. may the memory of senator inouye's indefatigable faithfulness provide a benchmark for the lives of all who labor for liberty. lord, intensify our dedication to make sacrifices for the good of our nation and world as we put our trust in you to do for us immeasurably, abundantly, above all that we can ask or imagine, according to your power working in and through us. we pray in your sovereign name. amen. >> senator dan inouye was a noble soul. one of the finest men i've ever met. united states senate and entire country are poorer for his l
of hillary clinton's security advisory board. thank you both for joining us this evening. >> thanks for having us on. >> eliot: steve let me start with you. after the way the president had reinforced susan rice, not only saying an attack on her is an attack on me at a press conference, the scripted applause and his statements about her at a cabinet meeting just recently, this seems like such a sharp u-turn and you heard me say a few moments ago seems as though the president caved. am i wrong about that? what do you understand to be going on here? >> well, i think it was. i think susan described it accurately. she's a very capable and competent woman who would have, i think done a great job as secretary of state. that said, it is a distraction. it has been a distraction. when jonathan karl asked the president what he thought of john mccain and lindsey graham's comments, i actually happened to be hosting the meeting that that happened at, it started a spark and you had a number of senators, john barossi was one susan
remain before the u.s. goes over the edge. that means tax hikes and spending cuts that could trigger another recession. congressional leaders will meet today at 3:00 p.m. eastern time. the full house not even expected to return to work until sunday. here is the guest list for today's showdown. the president, vice president biden, senate majority leader harry reid and house minority leader nancy pelosi on the democratic side. house speaker john boehner, mitch mcconnell representing the republicans. brianna keilar live from washington. what do we expect to happen today? any new offers from the president or house speaker? >> we don't know. right now, all eyes on the senate to see what senate majority leader harry reid can cobble together to get some republican support. technically, it's still possible to come to an agreement. that said, politically is a different story, and the prospects for coming to a deal are starting to dim. right now, we're hearing a whole lot of the blame game. a lot of public posturing from both sides as they prepare for the possibility of going over the cliff. l
'll be great. and there were those of us at the time who said that's not going to work. and the reason we said back then is it's not going to work if you put in this year a big surge in government spending, even if that makes gdp go up this year, next year it goes down again. so if we're going to do to policies they're going to recommend, we had to know it would be great next year, and we could afford to lose the 2% growth, and we'd take the stimulus away. since that didn't seem plausible at the time, what we argued back then -- i could e-mail you testimonies -- was that we need to pursue policies somewhat reminiscent of what we see in the 4% growth chapter now. we were talking about what next steps should be, and there wasn't a democratic senator in that hearing who was willing to defend the stimulus on the record. and i was, i was being, you know, pretty combative in my testimony, and nobody argued with me. and the point is that the economy is still terrible. i think 2% is actually optimistic for what we're growing right now. and everybody wants to do something to fix it, and that's a great
with everyone in our country paying his or her fair share. so this rule today that says give us authority to have other bills brought to the floor, well, one of those bills is the middle income tax cut, we are happy with that. but if that isn't the plan, then i urge my colleagues to vote no on the previous question because that will then enable us to bring a rule to the floor which calls for bringing forth the middle income tax cut before we leave here. again, we support the president and his proposal, which is fair, which reduces the deficit, which creates jobs, and which will work for the american people. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. gentleman from texas. mr. session: thank you very much, mr. speaker. with great respect to my dear friend, the gentlewoman from san francisco, and the minority leader, i'm delighted that she came down to engage us on this very important issue. the gentlewoman does recognize and know that the house on august 1, in fact, did exactly what she has suggested that they, and that is to t
intact. it's shames will and we need to do more than that. the people who sent us here deserve more than that we should not be crying out in the wilderness to work, we have been sent here to work and we need to get down to it. in the final hours of this congress and we have the threat of working christmas, if we have to do it to get things done, i'm willing to do that, but the majority should help solve the nation's most pressing issue, that's why we're here. do not activelyhoose to leave the work unfinished. as we silt and wait for gos on the fissclaldeliff, the other -- there is other legislation that's ready that could be done now, could help our markets, relieve the mind of employer, could give security to the middle class and people below that and we certainly ought to be doing it. today's rule simply does the following. all we're doing now at this minute is we're giving the majority the freedom to spend the rest of this month and the rest of this year on minor, noncontroversial legislation. i refuse to give this blank check to a majority that has yet to show any interest in complet
from the u.s., which was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan, would be to soften air bases then in lit august or september crush the remnants of the r.a.f. it was a good plan but it wasn't working and goring got hitler's permission to bomb the ports. bombing was so ineffective on both sides that meant they would be bombing houses. they did. and churchill said give it back to them. that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7, i think, the evening. and germans came 81 of the next 82 nights or something like that. and the terror bombing they feared and predicted began. and there was no stopping the bombers. host: how many were killed and how many wounded in great brita britain? guest: i think about 40,000 to 45,000 londoners and 60,000 throughout then the rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million, you extrapolate, that would be at the time almost 2 200,000 americans, unimaginable numbers then and now for us in the united states. host: physically what did winston do during that time, where did he live? how did he relate to london and great bri
? thank you. you do look familiar. where did i see you before? u.s. they good question, did you not? -- you asked a good question, did you not? what is your name again? >> danielle. >> you are old hat here. you do this all of the time. good to see you. have fun. >> have fun, hey. show me what we are doing. what kind of lollipops are these? is this white house honey? do you know these come from bees we keep in the backyard? why? they make fresh honey, and the health the garden grove. -- they help the garden grow. >> this is good. >> did you taste these? this is good. [laughter] these are really good. ?id you put sugar on these ne how do you get it curly? >> they turned out really cute, and it is a good crunch. we should give some of the photographers some of these to see how good they taste. those are so good. healthy, tasty expects. not bad. -- snacks. not bad. ok. now we desperate. i have to figure out what design. -- now we have to decorate. now i have to figure out what design. decisions, decisions. ok. >> this is all edible, ok, guys? >> once you put this on, you can eat this lo
, december 16, 2012. the flag over the u.s. capitol, over the white house, and in many locations across the country are at half staff today because of friday's school shooting in newtown, conn.. the nation's newspapers are full of details about what happened on friday. we would like to hear from you your opinions on how america can prevent mass shootings. is it the role of government or society to stop them? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. or join the conversation on facebook by looking for c-span and weighing in. you can also e mail us, journal@c-span.org. here is the first page -- front page of "the hartford current" this morning. "day of grieving." the top headline, along with a list of the victims. the employees, all women. the children, all around the age of 67. this is "the sunday bulletin." "residents gather to find comfort and pray." national newspapers also digging into this story. "the new york times" says that the peopl
to this story. >> what was amazing to us and what was relevant is the idea that nowhere on american television had a returning soldier returning from war been portrayed. and obviously in very circumstances in the case of our character, but that was something that really interested us but it felt like a good way to dramatize a lot of the questions we answered on "24" in a more knew answer fashion ten years after 9/11. a lot of questions that weren't clear then are even more complex now. what do we have to be afraid of? what's the price of our security? and these are the characters we created to ask those questions. >> and michael, with "the queen" what prompted that? decpwhrit came from another deal. it was a trilogy of films. the deal was a film made for british television about the supposed deal that was made between tony blair and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of
from almost every bank. we were in a 1932 situation. >> because of everything else around us. we were focused on congress' ineptitude at that time. and we got more scared by their unwillingness to pass the t.a.r.p. >> i have tremendous faith in our economy. we had great numbers yesterday. we had a good head of steam in housing and durable goods. >> better than expected at least. >> i think you could cool the economy a little bit. but unlike 2008, where i was worried that my paycheck wouldn't cash and my bank would fail, unlike the debt ceiling -- >> i know that. i'm saying it is a very, very different time now, no doubt about it. the only thing being we're relying on our leaders in washington to try to craft some sort of solution. >> did you have quotes around the word leader then? i'm only watching your lips. if you were to type that, would there be quotes around leaders? >> yes. >> thank you. i rest my case. >> i'm willing to take those quotes off. >> if they show that they are truly leaders without quotes. >> i come to work every day, my tallahassee paycheck, still in my wallet. i
♪ just like the ones that i used to know ♪ ♪ honey, it's where the tree tops, tree tops glisten ♪ ♪ and little bitty, little bitty, little bitty children, they're trying to listen ♪ ♪ to hear, hear for the sleigh bells that are ringing in the snow ♪ ♪ i wanna tell you one more time what i'm thinking about ♪ ♪ imus, imus, imus in the morning ♪ >> moments ago the new york stock exchange observed a moment of silence following the events in connecticut last friday. it was a somber moment in the financial world. ten minutes from now, trading will begin and these are the stories which we will concentrate on this monday morning. speaker boehner says, go ahead, raise tax rates on millionaires, that's a retreat. it's a new offer from john boehner, a higher tax rate on incomes over a million a year. gas prices really falling fast. in the whole state of missouri the average is 2.94. nine states are within a few cents of breaking below $3 a gallon. and yes, it's the monday after the connecticut shooting and father jonathan morris is here for "varney & company." scuba divi
on the "washington journal." you can start dialing in now, or you can contact us via social media. you can make a comment on our facebook page. you can also send us an e-mail. from "the hill" newspaper yesterday -- a new poll by abc news and "the washington post." 57% say they support a presidential bid from every clinton in 2016. -- from hillary clinton in 2016. 68% approved of her work as secretary of state. 66% hold a favorable view of clinton after her department has faced criticism over the handling of benghazi and libya. clinton also has heavy support in new york were 54% of registered voters say they would support a presidential bid by her in 2016. that is an "the hill" newspaper. we have lots of facebook comments already on this question. we want to share a couple of those with thieu. jackie says "she has my vote." williams says i think she has been a great job for secretary of state but will not vote for her for president. andy says hillary 2016. military spouses against the wars says she will fit in perfectly with all of the other war mongerers. those are some of the facebook comments
can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "one of the weaknesses of human nature of which ambitious politicians make you to serve their purposes." i year before he uttered those words, a group of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the original tea party and tea party movement were about. far from being patriots, the original tea partyers were smugglers. some of them, among the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a
happens and where we go, all of us may meet again. >> after learning about ambassador rice's withdraw the party tweeted bring it on hash tag massachusetts senates. the democrats got cute when john kerry was running for senate. they created this thing where you have to have an erosion. and then 150 days or somewhere you have this election. and so, it looks like the democrats feel confident enough that they can hold on to the seat. >> oops. here comes scott brown again. i think this is so irritating. you have the republican members of the senate deciding who the next secretary of state is. rather than admitting who the call is. you know washington is that senators prefer other senators and they would rather have a sweet deal. democrats say they are confident they can win another special election. but the whole thing smells. >> the last time i heard a confirmation hearing. >> he is the chairman of the committee that confirms the treasury secretary okay? and so we had to run the hearing even though the chairman is done there as the witness. bob dole said why don't we vote before the heari
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